Author : Walter I. Trattner
Genre : Public welfare
Publisher :
ISBN : UOM:39015016161344
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 290 page

Walter I. Trattner is Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Author : Walter I. Trattner
Genre : Public welfare
Publisher :
ISBN : 0029327113
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 408 page

Author : George R. Boyer
Genre : Business & Economics
Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN : 9780691183992
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 384 page

How did Britain transform itself from a nation of workhouses to one that became a model for the modern welfare state? The Winding Road to the Welfare State investigates the evolution of living standards and welfare policies in Britain from the 1830s to 1950 and provides insights into how British working-class households coped with economic insecurity. George Boyer examines the retrenchment in Victorian poor relief, the Liberal Welfare Reforms, and the beginnings of the postwar welfare state, and he describes how workers altered spending and saving methods based on changing government policies. From the cutting back of the Poor Law after 1834 to Parliament’s abrupt about-face in 1906 with the adoption of the Liberal Welfare Reforms, Boyer offers new explanations for oscillations in Britain’s social policies and how these shaped worker well-being. The Poor Law’s increasing stinginess led skilled manual workers to adopt self-help strategies, but this was not a feasible option for low-skilled workers, many of whom continued to rely on the Poor Law into old age. In contrast, the Liberal Welfare Reforms were a major watershed, marking the end of seven decades of declining support for the needy. Concluding with the Beveridge Report and Labour’s social policies in the late 1940s, Boyer shows how the Liberal Welfare Reforms laid the foundations for a national social safety net. A sweeping look at economic pressures after the Industrial Revolution, The Winding Road to the Welfare State illustrates how British welfare policy waxed and waned over the course of a century.

Author : Walter I. Trattner
Genre : History
Publisher : Free Press
ISBN : 0029327121
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 400 page

Author : David Garland
Genre : POLITICAL SCIENCE
Publisher : Oxford University Press
ISBN : 9780199672660
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 177 page

This 'Very Short Introduction' discusses the necessity of welfare states in modern capitalist societies. Situating social policy in an historical, sociological, and comparative perspective, David Garland brings a new understanding to familiar debates, policies, and institutions.

Author : Lorie Charlesworth
Genre : Law
Publisher : Routledge
ISBN : 9781135179632
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 240 page

That ‘poor law was law’ is a fact that has slipped from the consciousness of historians of welfare in England and Wales, and in North America. Welfare's Forgotten Past remedies this situation by tracing the history of the legal right of the settled poor to relief when destitute. Poor law was not simply local custom, but consisted of legal rights, duties and obligations that went beyond social altruism. This legal ‘truth’ is, however, still ignored or rejected by some historians, and thus ‘lost’ to social welfare policy-makers. This forgetting or minimising of a legal, enforceable right to relief has not only led to a misunderstanding of welfare’s past; it has also contributed to the stigmatisation of poverty, and the emergence and persistence of the idea that its relief is a 'gift' from the state. Documenting the history and the effects of this forgetting, whilst also providing a ‘legal’ history of welfare, Lorie Charlesworth argues that it is timely for social policy-makers and reformists – in Britain, the United States and elsewhere – to reconsider an alternative welfare model, based on the more positive, legal aspects of welfare’s 400-year legal history.

Author : Walter I. Trattner
Genre : Reference
Publisher : Greenwood
ISBN : STANFORD:36105018840921
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 368 page

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Author : Alvin Finkel
Genre : Political Science
Publisher : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN : 9781554588862
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 396 page

Social Policy and Practice in Canada: A History traces the history of social policy in Canada from the period of First Nations’ control to the present day, exploring the various ways in which residents of the area known today as Canada have organized themselves to deal with (or to ignore) the needs of the ill, the poor, the elderly, and the young. This book is the first synthesis on social policy in Canada to provide a critical perspective on the evolution of social policy in the country. While earlier work has treated each new social program as a major advance, and reacted with shock to neoliberalism’s attack on social programs, Alvin Finkel demonstrates that right-wing and left-wing forces have always battled to shape social policy in Canada. He argues that the notion of a welfare state consensus in the period after 1945 is misleading, and that the social programs developed before the neoliberal counteroffensive were far less radical than they are sometimes depicted. Social Policy and Practice in Canada: A History begins by exploring the non-state mechanisms employed by First Nations to insure the well-being of their members. It then deals with the role of the Church in New France and of voluntary organizations in British North America in helping the unfortunate. After examining why voluntary organizations gradually gave way to state-controlled programs, the book assesses the evolution of social policy in Canada in a variety of areas, including health care, treatment of the elderly, child care, housing, and poverty.

Author : E. P. Hennock
Genre : History
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
ISBN : 9780521592123
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 309 page

This book offers a comparison of the origins of the welfare state in England and Germany (1850-1914).

Author : David Brady
Genre : Social Science
Publisher : Oxford University Press
ISBN : 9780199888924
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 280 page

Poverty is not simply the result of an individual's characteristics, behaviors or abilities. Rather, as David Brady demonstrates, poverty is the result of politics. In Rich Democracies, Poor People, Brady investigates why poverty is so entrenched in some affluent democracies whereas it is a solvable problem in others. Drawing on over thirty years of data from eighteen countries, Brady argues that cross-national and historical variations in poverty are principally driven by differences in the generosity of the welfare state. An explicit challenge to mainstream views of poverty as an inescapable outcome of individual failings or a society's labor markets and demography, this book offers institutionalized power relations theory as an alternative explanation.