Author : James Reginato
Genre : House & Home
Publisher : National Geographic Books
ISBN : 9780847848980
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 0 page

This stunning book presents the intriguing stories and celebrated histories of some of the leading families of Great Britain and Ireland and the opulent residences that have defined their heritages. The history of England is inextricably linked with the stories of its leading aristocratic dynasties and the great seats they have occupied for centuries. As the current owners speak of the critical roles their ancestors have played in the nation, they bring history alive. All of these houses have survived great wars, economic upheavals, and, at times, scandal. Filled with stunning photography, this book is a remarkably intimate and lively look inside some of Britain’s stateliest houses, with the modern-day aristocrats who live in them and keep them going in high style. This book presents a tour of some of England’s finest residences, with many of the interiors shown here for the first time. It includes Blenheim Palace—seven acres under one roof, eclipsing the splendor of any of the British royal family’s residences—property of the Dukes of Marlborough; the exquisite Old Vicarage in Derbyshire, last residence of the late Dowager Duchess of Devonshire (née Deborah Mitford); Haddon Hall, a vast crenellated 900-year-old manor house belonging to the Dukes of Rutland that has been called the most romantic house in England; and the island paradises on Mustique and St. Lucia of the 3rd Baron Glenconner. This book is perfect for history buffs and lovers of traditional interior design and English country life.

Author : David Cannadine
Genre : History
Publisher : Yale University Press
ISBN : 0300059817
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 372 page

He reconstructs the extraordinary financial history of the dukes of Devonshire, narrates the story of the Cozens-Hardys, a Norfolk family who played a remarkably varied part in the life of their county, and offers a controversial reappraisal of the forebears, lives, work, and personalities of Harold Nicolson and Vita Sackville-West - a portrait, notes Cannadine, of more than a marriage.

Author : Lawrence James
Genre : History
Publisher : St. Martin's Press
ISBN : 1429982780
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 448 page

Aristocracy means "rule by the best." For nine hundred years, the British aristocracy considered itself ideally qualified to rule others, make laws, and guide the nation. Its virtues lay in its collective wisdom, its attachment to chivalric codes, and its sense of public duty. It evolved from a medieval warrior caste into a self-assured and sophisticated elite, which made itself the champion of popular liberty: It forced King John to sign the Magna Carta and later used its power and wealth to depose a succession of tyrannical kings from Richard II to James II. Britain's liberties and constitution were the result of aristocratic bloody-mindedness and courage. Aristocrats traces the history of this remarkable supremacy. It is a story of civil wars, conquests, intrigue, chicanery, and extremes of selflessness and greed. The aristocracy survived and, in the age of the great house and the Grand Tour, governed the first industrial nation while a knot of noblemen ruled its growing empire. Under pressure from below, this political power was slowly relinquished and then shared. Yet democratic Britain retained its aristocracy: Churchill, himself the grandson of a duke, presided over a wartime cabinet that contained six hereditary peers. Lawrence James illuminates the culture of this singular caste, shows how its infatuation with classical art has forged England's heritage, how its love of sport has shaped the nation's pastimes and values, and how its scandals have entertained its public. Impeccably researched, balanced, and brilliantly told, Aristocrats is an enthralling story of survival, a stunning history of wealth, power, and influence.

Author : Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
ISBN : 9781476730349
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 288 page

A nostalgic culinary pilgrimage, rediscovering the sort of classic, robust, wholesome food that would have emerged from the kitchen of an Edwardian country house like Downton Abbey. In this sumptuous cookbook, Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall takes us on a nostalgic culinary pilgrimage, rediscovering classic recipes from the Edwardian kitchen. With delicious dishes, adapted with today’s kitchen in mind and delightfully informed by reminiscences from Jane’s childhood, this is much more than a cookbook - it offers a slice of gastronomic history, reviving the flavours from the great English country houses.

Author : Hadley Keller
Genre :
Publisher :
ISBN : 0865654034
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 272 page

The planned community of Windsor, on a barrier island in Vero Beach, Florida, offers elegant yet casual seaside living at its best. This sublimely landscaped village, planned by the renowned New Urbanists Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater‑Zyberk, boasts houses by A‑list architects and top interior designers, among them John Stefanidis, Steven Gambrel, and Alessandra Branca. The exteriors, Anglo‑Caribbean in style, feature steeply pitched roofs, open eaves, cantilevered balconies, and palm‑shaded courtyards and pools. The interiors, all executed with exquisite craftsmanship and appointed with fine finishes, range in style from traditional to sleekly contemporary. Beachside presents a wide array of the houses, organized by room. Filled with photographs of bougainvillea‑framed entrances, airy open‑plan living-dining rooms, cozy studies, and bedrooms that open onto balconies with sweeping ocean views, Beachside will inspire anyone yearning for a stylish coastal life.

Author : Alexander M. Martin
Genre : History
Publisher : OUP Oxford
ISBN : 9780191640704
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 360 page

Imperial Russia, is was said, had two capital cities because it had two identities: St. Petersburg was Russia's "window to Europe," whereas Moscow preserved the nation's proud historical traditions. Enlightened Metropolis challenges this myth by exploring how the tsarist regime actually tried to turn Moscow into a bridgehead of Europe in the heartland of Russia. Moscow in the eighteenth century was widely scorned as backward and "Asiatic." The tsars thought it a benighted place that endangered their state's internal security and their effort to make Russia European. Beginning with Catherine the Great, they sought to construct a new Moscow, with European buildings and institutions, a Westernized "middle estate", and a new cultural image as an enlightened metropolis. Drawing on the methodologies of urban, social, institutional, cultural, and intellectual history, Enlightened Metropolis asks: How was the urban environment - buildings, institutions, streets, smells - transformed in the nine decades from Catherine's accession to the death of Nicholas I? How were the lives of the inhabitants changed? Did a "middle estate" come into being? How similar was Moscow's modernization to that of Western cities, and how was it affected by the disastrous occupation by Napoleon? Lastly, how were Moscow and its people imagined by writers, artists, and social commentators in Russia and the West from the Enlightenment to the mid-nineteenth century?

Author : Adrian Tinniswood
Genre : History
Publisher : Basic Books
ISBN : 9781541617995
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 432 page

A rollicking tour of the English country home after World War II, when swinging London collided with aristocratic values As the sun set slowly on the British Empire, its mansions fell and rose. Ancient families were reduced to demolishing the parts of their stately homes they could no longer afford, dukes and duchesses desperately clung to their ancestral seats, and a new class of homeowners bought their way into country life. A delicious romp, Noble Ambitions pulls us into these crumbling halls of power, leading us through the juiciest bits of postwar aristocratic history—from Mick Jagger dancing at deb balls to the scandals of Princess Margaret. Capturing the spirit of the age, historian Adrian Tinniswood proves that the country house is not only an iconic symbol, but a lens through which to understand the shifting fortunes of the British elite in an era of monumental social change.

Author : Simon Esmonde Cleary
Genre : History
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
ISBN : 9780521196499
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 551 page

This book focuses on the archaeological evidence, allowing fresh perspectives and new approaches to the fate of the Roman West.

Author : William Doyle
Genre : Social Science
Publisher : OUP Oxford
ISBN : 9780191500633
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 144 page

Aristocracies or nobilities dominated the social, economic, and institutional history of all European counties until only a few generations ago. The relics of their power, in traditions and behaviour, in architecture and the arts, are still all around us. This short introduction shows how ideas of aristocracy originated in ancient times, were transformed in the middle ages, and have only fallen apart over the last two centuries. The myths in which aristocracies have always sought to shroud themselves are stripped away, but the true sources of their enduring power are also revealed. Their outlook and behaviour affected the rest of society in innumerable and sometimes surprising ways, but perhaps most surprising was the way in which a centuries-old aristocratic hegemony crumbled away over the last two hundred years. In this Very Short Introduction William Doyle considers why this happend and what remains today. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Author : David Cannadine
Genre : Aristocracy (Social class)
Publisher :
ISBN : 0141023139
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 813 page

At the outset of the 1870s, the British aristocracy could rightly consider themselves the most fortunate people on earth: they held the lion's share of land, wealth and power in the world's greatest empire. By the end of the 1930s they had lost not only a generation of sons in the First World War, but also much of their prosperity, prestige and political significance.David Cannadine shows how this shift came about and how it was reinforced in the aftermath of the Second World War. Lucidly written and sparkling with wit, The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy is a landmark study that dramatically changes our understanding of British social history