Author : Michael P. Johnson
Genre : History
Publisher : Macmillan Higher Education
ISBN : 9781457605642
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 368 page

With five carefully selected documents per chapter, this two-volume primary source reader presents a wide range of documents representing political, social, and cultural history in a manageable, accessible way. Thirty-two new documents infuse the collection with the voices of an even wider range of historical actors. Expertly edited by Michael P. Johnson, one of the authors of The American Promise, the readings can be used to spark discussion in any classroom and fit into any syllabus. Headnotes and discussion questions help students approach the documents, and comparative questions encourage students to make connections across documents.

Author : James L. Roark
Genre : History
Publisher : Macmillan Higher Education
ISBN : 9781319004279
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 542 page

The American Promise, Value Edition, has long been a favorite with students who value the text’s readability, clear chronology, and lively voices of ordinary Americans, all in a portable format. Instructors have long valued the full narrative accompanied by a 2-color map program and the rich instructor resources of the parent text made available at an affordable price.

Author : Michael P. Johnson
Genre : History
Publisher : Bedford/st Martins
ISBN : UCSC:32106017068559
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 328 page

This two-volume primary-source collection provides a broad range of voices and perspectives from our nation's past, while emphasizing the important social, political, and economic themes of most U.S. history survey courses. Edited by one of the authors of The American Promise and designed to complement the textbook, Reading the American Past offers a rich selection of over 125 documents and editorial apparatus to aid students' understanding of the sources.

Author : Jill Lepore
Genre : History
Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN : 9780393635256
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 960 page

New York Times Bestseller In the most ambitious one-volume American history in decades, award-winning historian and New Yorker writer Jill Lepore offers a magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation, an urgently needed reckoning with the beauty and tragedy of American history. Written in elegiac prose, Lepore’s groundbreaking investigation places truth itself—a devotion to facts, proof, and evidence—at the center of the nation’s history. The American experiment rests on three ideas—"these truths," Jefferson called them—political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. And it rests, too, on a fearless dedication to inquiry, Lepore argues, because self-government depends on it. But has the nation, and democracy itself, delivered on that promise? These Truths tells this uniquely American story, beginning in 1492, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation’s truths, or belied them. To answer that question, Lepore traces the intertwined histories of American politics, law, journalism, and technology, from the colonial town meeting to the nineteenth-century party machine, from talk radio to twenty-first-century Internet polls, from Magna Carta to the Patriot Act, from the printing press to Facebook News. Along the way, Lepore’s sovereign chronicle is filled with arresting sketches of both well-known and lesser-known Americans, from a parade of presidents and a rogues’ gallery of political mischief makers to the intrepid leaders of protest movements, including Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist orator; William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate and ultimately tragic populist; Pauli Murray, the visionary civil rights strategist; and Phyllis Schlafly, the uncredited architect of modern conservatism. Americans are descended from slaves and slave owners, from conquerors and the conquered, from immigrants and from people who have fought to end immigration. "A nation born in contradiction will fight forever over the meaning of its history," Lepore writes, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. "The past is an inheritance, a gift and a burden," These Truths observes. "It can’t be shirked. There’s nothing for it but to get to know it."

Author : Paul Johnson
Genre : History
Publisher : Harper Collins
ISBN : 9780061952135
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 1104 page

"The creation of the United States of America is the greatest of all human adventures," begins Paul Johnson. "No other national story holds such tremendous lessons, for the American people themselves and for the rest of mankind." In his prize-winning classic, Johnson presents an in-depth portrait of American history from the first colonial settlements to the Clinton administration. This is the story of the men and women who shaped and led the nation and the ordinary people who collectively created its unique character. Littered with letters, diaries, and recorded conversations, it details the origins of their struggles for independence and nationhood, their heroic efforts and sacrifices to deal with the 'organic sin’ of slavery and the preservation of the Union to its explosive economic growth and emergence as a world power. Johnson discusses contemporary topics such as the politics of racism, education, the power of the press, political correctness, the growth of litigation, and the influence of women throughout history. He sees Americans as a problem-solving people and the story of their country as "essentially one of difficulties being overcome by intelligence and skill, by faith and strength of purpose, by courage and persistence... Looking back on its past, and forward to its future, the auguries are that it will not disappoint humanity." Sometimes controversial and always provocative, A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE is one author’s challenging and unique interpretation of American history. Johnson’s views of individuals, events, themes, and issues are original, critical, and in the end admiring, for he is, above all, a strong believer in the history and the destiny of the American people.

Author : Kathryn Stockett
Genre : Fiction
Publisher : Penguin
ISBN : 9781440697661
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 544 page

The #1 New York Times bestselling novel and basis for the Academy Award-winning film—a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don’t—nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. Aibileen is a black maid in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, who’s always taken orders quietly, but lately she’s unable to hold her bitterness back. Her friend Minny has never held her tongue but now must somehow keep secrets about her employer that leave her speechless. White socialite Skeeter just graduated college. She’s full of ambition, but without a husband, she’s considered a failure. Together, these seemingly different women join together to write a tell-all book about work as a black maid in the South, that could forever alter their destinies and the life of a small town...

Author : Howard Zinn
Genre : History
Publisher : Harper Perennial Modern Classics
ISBN : 0060528370
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 752 page

Presents the history of the United States from the point of view of those who were exploited in the name of American progress.

Author : Matthew F. Delmont
Genre : History
Publisher : Penguin
ISBN : 9781984880406
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 401 page

A New York Times Notable Book for 2022 The definitive history of World War II from the African American perspective, written by civil rights expert and Dartmouth history professor Matthew Delmont “Matthew F. Delmont’s book is filled with compelling narratives that outline with nuance, rigor, and complexity how Black Americans fought for this country abroad while simultaneously fighting for their rights here in the​ United States. Half American belongs firmly within the canon of indispensable World War II books.” —Clint Smith, #1 New York Times bestselling author of How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America Over one million Black men and women served in World War II. Black troops were at Normandy, Iwo Jima, and the Battle of the Bulge, serving in segregated units and performing unheralded but vital support jobs, only to be denied housing and educational opportunities on their return home. Without their crucial contributions to the war effort, the United States could not have won the war. And yet the stories of these Black veterans have long been ignored, cast aside in favor of the myth of the “Good War” fought by the “Greatest Generation.” Half American is American history as you’ve likely never read it before. In these pages are stories of Black heroes such as Thurgood Marshall, the chief lawyer for the NAACP, who investigated and publicized violence against Black troops and veterans; Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., leader of the Tuskegee Airmen, who was at the forefront of the years-long fight to open the Air Force to Black pilots; Ella Baker, the civil rights leader who advocated on the home front for Black soldiers, veterans, and their families; James Thompson, the 26-year-old whose letter to a newspaper laying bare the hypocrisy of fighting against fascism abroad when racism still reigned at home set in motion the Double Victory campaign; and poet Langston Hughes, who worked as a war correspondent for the Black press. Their bravery and patriotism in the face of unfathomable racism is both inspiring and galvanizing. In a time when the questions World War II raised regarding race and democracy in America remain troublingly relevant and still unanswered, this meticulously researched retelling makes for urgently necessary reading.

Author : Richard Hofstadter
Genre : Political Science
Publisher : Vintage
ISBN : 9780307388445
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 370 page

This timely reissue of Richard Hofstadter's classic work on the fringe groups that influence American electoral politics offers an invaluable perspective on contemporary domestic affairs.In The Paranoid Style in American Politics, acclaimed historian Richard Hofstadter examines the competing forces in American political discourse and how fringe groups can influence — and derail — the larger agendas of a political party. He investigates the politics of the irrational, shedding light on how the behavior of individuals can seem out of proportion with actual political issues, and how such behavior impacts larger groups. With such other classic essays as “Free Silver and the Mind of 'Coin' Harvey” and “What Happened to the Antitrust Movement?, ” The Paranoid Style in American Politics remains both a seminal text of political history and a vital analysis of the ways in which political groups function in the United States.

Author : Harry L. Watson
Genre : History
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
ISBN : 9780226300825
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 479 page

"Building the American Republic tells the story of United States with remarkable grace and skill, its fast moving narrative making the nation's struggles and accomplishments new and compelling. Weaving together stories of abroad range of Americans. Volume 1 starts at sea and ends on the field. Beginning with the earliest Americans and the arrival of strangers on the eastern shore, it then moves through colonial society to the fight for independence and the construction of a federal republic. Vol 2 opens as America struggles to regain its footing, reeling from a presidential assassination and facing massive economic growth, rapid demographic change, and combustive politics.