Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Liveright Publishing
ISBN : 9781631492464
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 528 page

Featuring a new chapter on ten restaurants changing America today, a “fascinating . . . sweep through centuries of food culture” (Washington Post). Combining an historian’s rigor with a food enthusiast’s palate, Paul Freedman’s seminal and highly entertaining Ten Restaurants That Changed America reveals how the history of our restaurants reflects nothing less than the history of America itself. Whether charting the rise of our love affair with Chinese food through San Francisco’s fabled Mandarin; evoking the poignant nostalgia of Howard Johnson’s, the beloved roadside chain that foreshadowed the pandemic of McDonald’s; or chronicling the convivial lunchtime crowd at Schrafft’s, the first dining establishment to cater to women’s tastes, Freedman uses each restaurant to reveal a wider story of race and class, immigration and assimilation. “As much about the contradictions and contrasts in this country as it is about its places to eat” (The New Yorker), Ten Restaurants That Changed America is a “must-read” (Eater) that proves “essential for anyone who cares about where they go to dinner” (Wall Street Journal Magazine).

Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Cooking
Publisher :
ISBN : 1631494988
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 560 page

Combining an historian's rigor with a food enthusiast's palate, Paul Freedman's seminal and highly entertaining Ten Restaurants That Changed America reveals how the history of our restaurants reflects nothing less than the history of America itself. Whether charting the rise of our love affair with Chinese food through San Francisco's fabled Mandarin; evoking the poignant nostalgia of Howard Johnson's, the beloved roadside chain that foreshadowed the pandemic of McDonald's; or chronicling the convivial lunchtime crowd at Schrafft's, the first dining establishment to cater to women's tastes, Freedman uses each restaurant to reveal a wider story of race and class, immigration and assimilation. "As much about the contradictions and contrasts in this country as it is about its places to eat" (The New Yorker), Ten Restaurants That Changed America is a "must-read" (Eater) that proves "essential for anyone who cares about where they go to dinner" (Wall Street Journal Magazine).

Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Liveright Publishing Corporation
ISBN : 0871406802
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 527 page

From Delmonico's to Sylvia's to Chez Panisse, a daring and original history of dining out in America as told through ten legendary restaurants.

Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Liveright Publishing
ISBN : 9781631494635
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 528 page

With an ambitious sweep over two hundred years, Paul Freedman’s lavishly illustrated history shows that there actually is an American cuisine. For centuries, skeptical foreigners—and even millions of Americans—have believed there was no such thing as American cuisine. In recent decades, hamburgers, hot dogs, and pizza have been thought to define the nation’s palate. Not so, says food historian Paul Freedman, who demonstrates that there is an exuberant and diverse, if not always coherent, American cuisine that reflects the history of the nation itself. Combining historical rigor and culinary passion, Freedman underscores three recurrent themes—regionality, standardization, and variety—that shape a completely novel history of the United States. From the colonial period until after the Civil War, there was a patchwork of regional cooking styles that produced local standouts, such as gumbo from southern Louisiana, or clam chowder from New England. Later, this kind of regional identity was manipulated for historical effect, as in Southern cookbooks that mythologized gracious “plantation hospitality,” rendering invisible the African Americans who originated much of the region’s food. As the industrial revolution produced rapid changes in every sphere of life, the American palate dramatically shifted from local to processed. A new urban class clamored for convenient, modern meals and the freshness of regional cuisine disappeared, replaced by packaged and standardized products—such as canned peas, baloney, sliced white bread, and jarred baby food. By the early twentieth century, the era of homogenized American food was in full swing. Bolstered by nutrition “experts,” marketing consultants, and advertising executives, food companies convinced consumers that industrial food tasted fine and, more importantly, was convenient and nutritious. No group was more susceptible to the blandishments of advertisers than women, who were made feel that their husbands might stray if not satisfied with the meals provided at home. On the other hand, men wanted women to be svelte, sporty companions, not kitchen drudges. The solution companies offered was time-saving recipes using modern processed helpers. Men supposedly liked hearty food, while women were portrayed as fond of fussy, “dainty,” colorful, but tasteless dishes—tuna salad sandwiches, multicolored Jell-O, or artificial crab toppings. The 1970s saw the zenith of processed-food hegemony, but also the beginning of a food revolution in California. What became known as New American cuisine rejected the blandness of standardized food in favor of the actual taste and pleasure that seasonal, locally grown products provided. The result was a farm-to-table trend that continues to dominate. “A book to be savored” (Stephen Aron), American Cuisine is also a repository of anecdotes that will delight food lovers: how dry cereal was created by William Kellogg for people with digestive and low-energy problems; that chicken Parmesan, the beloved Italian favorite, is actually an American invention; and that Florida Key lime pie goes back only to the 1940s and was based on a recipe developed by Borden’s condensed milk. More emphatically, Freedman shows that American cuisine would be nowhere without the constant influx of immigrants, who have popularized everything from tacos to sushi rolls. “Impeccably researched, intellectually satisfying, and hugely readable” (Simon Majumdar), American Cuisine is a landmark work that sheds astonishing light on a history most of us thought we never had.

Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Univ of California Press
ISBN : 0520254767
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 368 page

This richly illustrated book applies the discoveries of the new generation of food historians to the pleasures of dining and the culinary accomplishments of diverse civilizations, past and present. Freedman gathers essays by French, German, Belgian, American, and British historians to present a comprehensive, chronological history of taste.

Author : Tom Roston
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Abrams
ISBN : 9781683356936
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 319 page

An “engrossing” history of the restaurant atop the World Trade Center “that ruled the New York City skyline from April 1976 until September 11, 2001” (Booklist, starred review). In the 1970s, New York City was plagued by crime, filth, and an ineffective government. The city was falling apart, and even the newly constructed World Trade Center threatened to be a fiasco. But in April 1976, a quarter-mile up on the 107th floor of the North Tower, a new restaurant called Windows on the World opened its doors—a glittering sign that New York wasn’t done just yet. In The Most Spectacular Restaurant in the World, journalist Tom Roston tells the complete history of this incredible restaurant, from its stunning $14-million opening to 9/11 and its tragic end. There are stories of the people behind it, such as Joe Baum, the celebrated restaurateur, who was said to be the only man who could outspend an unlimited budget; the well-tipped waiters; and the cavalcade of famous guests as well as everyday people celebrating the key moments in their lives. Roston also charts the changes in American food, from baroque and theatrical to locally sourced and organic. Built on nearly 150 original interviews, The Most Spectacular Restaurant in the World is the story of New York City’s restaurant culture and the quintessential American drive to succeed. “Roston also digs deeply into the history of New York restaurants, and how Windows on the World was shaped by the politics and social conditions of its era.” —The New York Times “The city’s premier celebration venue, deeply woven into its social, culinary and business fabrics, deserved a proper history. Roston delivers it with power, detail, humor and heartbreak to spare.” ?New York Post “A rich, complex account.” ?Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Social Science
Publisher : Yale University Press
ISBN : 9780300253771
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 216 page

An award-winning historian makes the case for food's cultural importance, stressing its crucial role throughout human history

Author : Charles Ranhofer
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Courier Dover Publications
ISBN : 9781606601051
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 1200 page

Complete culinary encyclopedia, with more than 3,500 recipes and nearly 800 black-and-white illustrations. This edition of the great classic is available in a splendid hardcover facsimile of the rare 1893 original.

Author : Paul Freedman
Genre : Food
Publisher :
ISBN : 0500295379
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 368 page

Surveys the history of changing tastes in food and fine dining - what was available for people to eat, and how it was prepared and served - from prehistory to the present daySince earliest times food has encompassed so much more than just what we eat - whole societies can be revealed and analysed by their cusines. In this wide-ranging book, leading historians from Europe and America piece together from a myriad sources the culinary accomplishments of diverse civilizations, past and present, and the pleasures of dining. Ten chapters cover the food and taste of the hunter-gatherers and first farmers of Prehistory; the rich Mediterranean cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome; the development of gastronomy in Imperial China; Medieval Islamic cuisine; European food in the Middle Ages; the decisive changes in food fashions after the Renaissance; the effect of the Industrial Revolution on what people ate; the rise to dominance of French cuisine in the 19th and 20th centuries; the evolution of the restaurant; the contemporary situation where everything from slow to fast food vies for our attention. Throughout, the entertaining story of worldwide food traditions provides the ideal backdrop to today's roaming the globe for great gastronomic experiences.

Author : Judith Choate
Genre : Cooking
Publisher : Stewart, Tabori and Chang
ISBN : 1584797223
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 224 page

Paying tribute to America's oldest restaurant, Delmonico's in Manhattan, a collection of eighty recipes re-creates the signature dishes that the restaurant made famous, including Lobster à la Newburg, Eggs Benedict, Manhattan Clam Chowder, and Baked Alaska, along with a gastronomic history that follows Delmonico's from its founding in 1837.